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Old phone systems do not meet current continuity standards

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A lot of companies do not take the repercussions of failing to implement a robust business continuity program seriously, rendering them helpless if a natural or man-made disaster were to impact their operations. After witnessing the devastating impact that hurricanes and other phenomena had on the private sector over the course of 2012, decision-makers need to rally behind the deployment of a robust recovery program, which will often include replacing old phone systems and updating other parts of the infrastructure.

A Business 2 Community report highlighted that a large part of the business world takes anytime access to mission-critical resources for granted. However, failing to support this mentality with technology will only result in significant problems. For this reason, executives need to take the time to plan continuity efforts well in advance or risk losing the ability to operate on a fundamental level.

Preparation means companies need to understand what assets are in their possession, and how using specific technologies can reinforce the ability to use these resources at any time, despite unforeseen and uncontrollable external circumstances. Business 2 Community noted that even several minutes can have a monumentally negative impact on a firm's bottom line and its ability to meet employee and customer demands.

Dropping outdated telecommunications

Continuity programs are centered around business VoIP services and other advanced telecom solutions, not necessarily antiquated land line offerings. This is largely because an organization that does not support the employee's ability to communicate with colleagues, customers and partners will not be able to address the needs of today's private sector.

Enterprise VoIP is unlike its predecessor in the fact that it supports remote connectivity through a variety of endpoints. This means that individuals can use personal smartphones, tablets and other devices to communicate even when those people are located outside of the office - a common occurrence when an organization is trying to cope with carrying on operations in the wake of a disaster.

Business 2 Community stated that most advanced telecom services also allow for call diverting, which means consumers will still be able to reach companies. As recovery initiatives become more critical to long-term survival, executives are also looking to the cloud, as this innovative hosted environment supports even more continuity capabilities.

Cloud is disaster recovery game changer

Unlike conventional phone systems, a hosted PBX can be easily restored and accessed from virtually any location, giving organizations the ability to quickly recover communications in a post-disaster setting. Cloud services can also be used as advanced backup technologies, as they provide digital duplicates of critical information to keep operations efficient during the confusion of an emergency, the news source stated.

A recent study of roughly 1,300 IT professionals by Computer Weekly and TechTarget revealed that cloud-enabled disaster recovery programs are on the rise, as more than 28 percent of respondents said they intend to use the hosted services for continuity purposes this year. This jump, up from the 18 percent of organizations currently using the technology, suggests that the cloud offers businesses a number of unique opportunities when developing a robust survival strategies.

As enterprises continue to support a remote workforce and implement well-rounded disaster recovery initiatives, they will increasingly migrate away from outdated land line telecommunications and look to digital or cloud-based services. This is because the latter is more scalable, flexible and cost-effective, making cloud-based tools ideal in the wake of an emergency. By planning ahead and finding the right vendor, decision-makers will be able to establish a robust continuity strategy that will support long-term success.