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Cloud computing makes IT go further

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Businesses are always searching not only for ways to make it easier for employees to collaborate, but also innovative technologies that boost productivity. Cloud computing is considered ideal for helping companies redefine how they operate. Whether it is to improve their unified communications deployments, lower IT spending or simply compete with rival firms, the cloud offers a solution to pretty much any IT need.

A recent survey of 310 U.S. senior finance executives by CFO Research found that many companies believe the cloud is crucial to enhancing worker productivity. More than 80 percent of participants said that a full implementation of a cloud solution boosts worker production throughout an entire company. Another 31 percent indicated that cloud-based systems have exceeded expectations for enhancing employee mobility. Only 9 percent said the technology fell short in this area.

Overall, 76 percent of executives agreed that a successful cloud computing strategy will be important for their companies' success in the near future. Of the businesses already leveraging the cloud, 71 percent said the solution has met or exceeded expectations regarding hardware-related costs. Sixty-six percent experienced similar feelings about system backup and recovery, while an additional 66 percent named software spending. Another 59 percent cited IT labor costs, according to the survey.

"Finance executives see the cloud as means of improving IT performance," CFO research editor, Matt Surka. "The cloud certainly offers cost savings, but finance executives are most interested in using the cloud to redirect IT resources to high-value activities - not strip resources out of IT."

Businesses don't have to stop working

Cloud computing is also ideal for helping organizations gain the ability to operate at all times, according to a recent CloudTweaks report by Kyle Torpey. The writer explained that the technology enables employees to access corporate documents anywhere, even while at home cooking dinner.

Torpey noted that Gmail and Google Docs are examples of platforms companies can use to improve worker collaboration. Rather than have marketing and development teams come into the office for a short period time to view work, these staff members can make changes to documents throughout the day.

"Other co-workers may actually contribute their input to that change before the next working day begins," Torpey wrote. "In fact, the whole idea of the working day really goes out the window, because everyone can basically put in their two cents on a project at certain points during the day."